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Shootouts

shootouts

Übersetzung im Kontext von „shootouts“ in Englisch-Deutsch von Reverso Context: So an exception to this, however, is penalty shootouts. Shootout. Shootout (Schlacht), mit Waffen ausgetragene Auseinandersetzung ( siehe Western, manchmal der Showdown); Shootout – Keine Gnade, Actionfilm. Viele übersetzte Beispielsätze mit "shootout" – Deutsch-Englisch Wörterbuch und Suchmaschine für Millionen von Deutsch-Übersetzungen.

I unhooked my main antenna and stuck in an 8-inch piece of wire. The Nak was able to pick up most every station I normally hear but they automatically switched to mono and stayed very quiet.

Pretty impressive, in a way, but I still had no noise for the Schotz to kill. I then hooked up a Godar indoor antenna. Now we were getting stereo signals on SOME stations.

I was able to find only two stereo signals with enough noise to use the Schotz circuit, and it did diminish that background noise.

IMO, not much of a gimmick to spend your money on. Buy yourself a good FM antenna for the roof or attic instead.

While the bass went deep, it had a sort of muffled sound to it. At times, I noticed the extreme highs to be somewhat rolled off in comparison to the LT.

Such a pretty face, such a beautiful chassis, but does she have inner beauty? Is her beauty only skin deep? It is my habit of late, when testing new tuners, to plug them in and let them "cook" for a couple of days.

The LT sees almost daily usage and some of these tuners may have sat for months. I also go in and clean the variable caps and switches in analog tuners.

Kind of a tune r up before the big race. The names of these two Kenwoods are close and confusing so I will call them king and maiden for this Shootout.

I trust you know which one the present king is. During listening tests, it was apparent that the king still squeezed out the last measure of bass over the maiden.

The soundstage of our maiden was more forward but was never unpleasant sounding. When listening to her sing all alone while the king slept, I forgot about his virtues and enjoyed the experience.

And so, the maiden did turn out to be more than just another pretty face and she does have a beautiful voice to go along with her good looks. The lamp flickers but this almost disappears when fine-tuning the antenna.

Our maiden held a steady stereo signal but at the cost of slightly more background hiss. This was only noticed during quiet passages and brief periods of dead air.

The maiden, however had trouble holding off the advances of the I think she may be due a fresh alignment. The medium to high-signal stations were well received by both king and maiden alike.

The once and future king, the LT. So many lights and buttons. At least I can tell how it sounds. The bass, though deep, did not have that extra slam of the top tuners.

In the final analysis, I would sum up the sound as pleasant, articulate, but lacking the dynamics of some of the boys at the top.

Most of my serious listening judgments are formed while tuned into local stations with strong signals. It was interesting to see how aggressive the TII was in deciding when to activate the narrow modes, hi-blend, etc.

Along with this automatic protection, the soundstage, imaging and "life" to the music were dulled, if not lost.

When manually switching to wide mode and turning off the blend circuit on stations with fair signal strength, I was able to recapture the music with little or no noise.

The auto controls were first noticed when tuning to I sat down and was surprised how dull the sound had become compared to the LT. Manual switching brought it back to life and with a clean background.

To handicap the tuners and be fair, I switched the LT to auto and left it in narrow mode. On antenna input A, I had been listening to There is probably degrees difference.

With the tuner still at A very sensitive tuner indeed. Pointing the antenna more accurately, the LT was able to capture this signal but with more noise.

The II was also able to capture and hold this weak signal through a wider degree of antenna travel than the LT. I should stop here and give some information on station distances from my house.

There are about 70 stations within 70 miles, about 30 within 40 miles and 21 stations planted at the antenna farm, Both tuners liked the signal on this day but only in narrow.

The Kenwood shut to mono while the Onkyo held onto stereo but with more noise. When manually switched to mono, both tuners shared the same good signal characteristics.

I turned the antenna to the east in hopes of capturing In the past, the LT usually ruled here and it was able to pick up the signal, but never as clean or over as much antenna rotation as the II.

Turning to our other problem test signal, This station was most enjoyable when switched to mono in either tuner.

Again I found the auto circuits in the II to be overactive at When I manually switched to wide mode, both these stations came in loud and clear.

I did notice, I was able to pick up a weak Spanish language station, It must be all those trees my antenna looks into, toward the east.

The TII proved to be as sensitive as a year-old jumping into puberty and, as such, needs a little direction and control for me to live with. And just like any teenager, be careful which buttons you push!

Well, that tears it - I need to get this Kenwood aligned! The TU-X is an attractive tuner having good clean lines and a digital display with a muted orange numbering system.

The orange display is a nice change from the "me too" pale blue so often seen. This tuner has two antenna inputs, switchable from the front panel.

Is this necessary for those with a good outdoor antenna and rotor? Station selection is a two-step process.

You touch a number, the selected station frequency appears, flashing, and you must then push ENTER to listen to that station.

At first, I thought "gimmick," then realized it helps the listener find the station sought without having to memorize the whole number pad. The Sansui was pulling nothing but noise.

I was consistently able to grab more weak signals through the LT. The Kenwood kept things quiet over a wider antenna swing.

I grabbed this Sansui off eBay a while back following the recommendation of a friend whose ears I trust, and he was right! Before you read the comments below, hear this.

This Sansui has one of the sweetest, cleanest midranges of the tuners so far in the Shootouts. I had to listen very carefully to hear subtle differences against the LT.

The Sansui held its own but gave up a little to the Kenwood from the deep bass through the lower midrange. This may go hand-in-hand with the feeling of slightly less ambiance information.

After all is said and tested, the TU-X ranks up there with the other tuners for best sound quality in an inexpensive stock tuner, and it invites long listening sessions.

Like the Luxman T, it just missed the Class -C- rating because of the slight lightness in the bass and lower midrange. Many of us believe "the music is in the midrange," but for a tuner to make Class -C-, it must have more of that bass magic originally in the music.

In the end, I say, highly recommended. I was almost afraid to "fix" things inside the TU-X BUT pulled six old caps before and after the LA, then installed four Black Gates and two pieces of wire and this gave the tuner even better sound quality.

Now, who among us is up to the challenge of building a "to die for" audio stage to follow that LA chip in this Sansui or the Luxman right below it?

Winner for best all-around tuner? Great sound, good DXer. But our shootout king was wounded in the midrange. Is there a tuner doctor in the house?!

Meridian Model Winner: I was quite excited when Jesse added this little jewel to his collection. And I do mean little as it is the smallest FM tuner on our Shootout list.

See, I told you it was a jewel. After adjusting a slug to the station of your choice, you flip the TUNE switch down to fine-tune that station.

These adjustments are similar to those on the Magnum Dynalab FT The Meridian is an "always-on" tuner. Opening up this jewelry box shows a tight, no-nonsense space crowded with a toroidal transformer, an HA that plugs in LPF filter, a bi-FET LF buffer amp with four 10uf volt caps around it, and one large supply cap an inch away.

Unfortunately, it only has a positive supply for the audio stage, so we have to keep all the caps. They were among the first, if not the first, to try to fix the sonic problems of the compact disc in its infancy.

DX play was all but forgotten on this little guy and I just sat and listened. What I first noticed was it killed the LT! It was open, airy and lifelike while the LT was dark, closed-in and lifeless.

I checked both tuners. All switches on the LT were set correctly, auto, wide, etc. The LT had shut down to near mono while the gimmick-free Meridian was playing happily along.

After adjusting the antenna correctly, I started listening again. Well, the Jewel of the Meridian turned out to be the high point of my day.

Here we have a real treat. From the lower midrange all the way to the top, these two tuners were very close sonic twins.

There is a hint more midrange openness to the Meridian and a little loss of perceived front-to-rear depth. This may come from the slight loss of bass and dynamics compared to the LT.

When I get a tuner that sounds this nice, I usually turn the LT off and enjoy it. That is the plan for this jewel all weekend.

It may be small but it sure does shine. OK gang, hang on to the antenna as we spin around the airwaves The LT sounds more focused on solo voice.

On the T, vocals stepped back in the soundstage and center images were more diffuse. College station, rock, classical, more. Weakest local area station we can see up here.

The LT came through, in narrow, as usual. This was surprising and disappointing because the T tunes in 2. The T gave a clean crisp stereo signal with some background noise.

Listener-supported, volunteer DJs and non-profit. They play a crazy variety of everything but "normal" music if I have the right to decide what is normal.

A pattern is developing with the two tuners. The LT has more weight to its bass, while the T seems to go as deep but sounds lighter.

The highs of the T are more extended while staying delicate and never harsh. They are all memorized and some still are favorites.

It was hard to hear any small differences here. A rock station is a rock station. Owned by the city of Dallas, which is sucking the money and life out of it.

Piano solos showed a noticeable difference in the two tuners. The T was lighter but more realistic-sounding of the two.

Was unable to hear a big difference in the two tuners here. An interesting study of what recording engineers can do with sound. There are constant, but varying background noise problems.

They also add copious amounts of bass to the music to make it more inviting, no matter what you listen through. The differences between the tuners under test were less noticeable in the afternoon than when I first started testing in the morning.

I left the Audiolab on all night and the warmed-up signal was definitely closer to the LT. OK gang, you can step off the spinning antenna, our flight is over.

Hope you enjoyed the ride. Background noise was always low or nonexistent. The midrange was rich and realistic-sounding, but less focused.

The highs were right on and were an added asset to the final sonic picture. Inside was a DIY dream. There were over 30 polypropylene caps peppering the boards, 5 ceramic filters, the MPX chip was an LA, the audio stage backs right up against the RCA jacks and the power transformer is a large toroidal with a wall shielding it from the analog stages.

Recommended, but the winner is the LT. I first jumped in the water with a Sansui tube receiver purchased while in the Air Force in Two waterlogged old memories came to mind when I put this Carver in my system.

Twenty or so years ago, I saw my first TX and heard Magnaplanars for the first time. Back then, neither was in the budget for this sailor, but things changed as my thirst grew.

I first sat down and listened to this TXb solo and was rewarded with punchy bass and pleasant, articulate mids and highs.

The midrange and highs still brought a smile and I had to finally admit that this was a much better-sounding tuner than the original TX at least the one I owned.

Sorry for the bad pun, Mr. DX tests started at Here both tuners had good to fair signals but when switched to wide, the TXb lost the battle.

Our other weak neighbor, This is the first time I remember listening to AM stereo. The Carver manual says to keep AM de-emphasis switched on and, after listening to it both ways, I agree.

It was interesting and strange to listen to AM in stereo. I found two stereo stations, KAAM which played many songs so old they were obviously "electronically reprocessed for stereo" remember those?

The winner for everything but AM Stereo? The first thing I noticed on this Pioneer was the different wording on the face: Aha, the new and improved version of the previously reviewed paternal twin, the F The FX is a thin black digital tuner with colorful lights and a display that is, thankfully, on the safer side of gaudy.

There was a nice surprise waiting regarding reception quality. On the torture test at The best signal for the Pioneer was centered at When centered at In all the DX tests, the Pioneer was quite impressive around the dial.

The only advantage the LT seemed to have was its ability to fine tune, because of its infinitely variable capacitor, as opposed to the FX which can tune in 50 kHz steps only - better than most digital tuners which tend to tune in.

Sweeping that big dose of reality under the rug cleared things up nicely for our study of the midrange and highs. Things throughout the rest of the range came forth in a sweet, clean presentation that was most pleasant to experience, although somewhat lighter than the LT.

We can now add the FX to that list. When it came time to listen to the FX alone, I knew my review work was over and it was happy hour.

The SAE is a nice-looking tuner with a red digital readout. This one was black, inch rack-mount style.

There was a noticeable narrow-frequency ssss type sibilance. Whether this is common to this model or just that this piece could use an alignment, I do not know.

The sound was more forward and more diffuse than the much more "sonically correct" LT. SAE fans or collectors may choose this one, but not me.

Kind of a final overview as to whether I would want the tuner permanently in my system. The KT turned out to be on that short list. Going head to head with the LT, the KT had a flatter soundstage with a more extended but nice treble.

Musically, another nice keeper. Inside there is one op-amp and three op-amps in the low-pass filter and audio section. To this audio purist sorry Kenwood , op-amps, instead of passive devices in the LPF, looks like an area that could hurt the sound.

Also, the KT would occasionally lose the signal and "go to black" while the LT held onto this weak signal with consistency. McIntosh MR 80 Winner: There are, thankfully, a growing number of excellent-sounding tuners that have spent time on the Shootout shelf.

I say excellent in contrast to very good or just OK. The excellent badge is signified by the -C- symbol in the Shootout rankings. To describe the Kenwood LT, I would say it has a very natural sound with an excellent three-dimensional soundstage.

The individual images are often pinpoint and focused, while remaining full-bodied and lifelike. This depends on the recordings, of course, as with any source, but this tuner always seems to bring home the goods.

The apparent front-to-rear imaging is very believable. Voice, musical instruments and sounds have a solid, tangible life that helps make the whole listening experience something to look forward to.

If I could only tie the Philips AH highs on Now that would be THE tuner! Now, onto the Kenwood LT vs. Oh, the poor old Mac. What an act to follow after all the praise just showered on the LT.

Well, have heart, all you Mac aficionados, this Mac sounds very nice. A very pleasant sound indeed. It has been in the system for well over a week and may stay there even longer.

This Mac must weigh at least forty pounds [including cabinet, I presume? This variety of positions gave me good insight into the sonic charms of the MR The trouble with many of these tuners, or maybe their saving grace, is they can sound different, sometimes very different from the LT and still be a pleasure to listen to.

Case in point this time, our MR There was no harshness, hardness, or brightness, and no slight "mechanical" sound like I observed in the MR Nothing came forth that would send it plunging to the bottom of the Shootout barrel.

Turning the antenna toward our DX tests, we first land on The MR 80 was quieter than the LT with both tuners in their narrowest modes. Even though the stereo lamps on both tuners were lit, with occasional flickers, the sound was hardly more than mono.

An interesting sonic difference was that the MR 80 sounded more muted and distant while the mono signal from the LT continued to present a more open, lively sound.

When trying to listen to both tuners in the widest mode, the MR 80 still came out on top with the quieter signal. Swinging the antenna east to our other problem child, On medium to strong signals, no problems were encountered on either of these great tuners.

I see this NAD as an attractive, medium gray tuner with clean lines. While it stood alone in the ring, I was confronted with a pleasant sound and nice, punchy bass.

The midrange was clean and articulate, but there was a touch of extra sibilance noticed on spoken voice. The midrange, however, had a slightly thinner sound that robbed the music of some life.

The highs blended nicely with the mids and were never what I would call bright-sounding. When I proofread these reviews, I realize my judgments may seem harsh on some Shootout "victims"?

The problem is, there are a few tuners out there that get most everything "just right. Upon rereading this review a few months after writing it, and seeing where I originally placed the NAD on the Shootout list, I had to ask myself why I gave it such a relatively high rating.

There are tuners below it that sound, well, nicer BUT less dynamic, less lively. This seems to happen when some tuners have their outputs taken directly off the MPX chip no buffer circuit.

On such tuners, you get a pleasant enough sound that most of us could live with, but you lose some of that excitement found in a real musical experience.

The added buffer circuitry can, IMO, both add to and take away from the final sonic picture. We may gain better bass control and extension but lose some midrange pleasantness or, when we get lucky, everything improves for the better.

When it was finally time to put this review up, I left the NAD in its original list position. The LT was able to capture With both tuners tuned to our other weak neighbor to the east at One interesting thing occurred during testing.

I had both tuners tuned in to Under these conditions, the NAD became noisy and bright compared to the LT, which kept its normal sonic balance.

Adjusting the antenna brought things back to normal. The NAD had no problems with local stations with average or above-average power.

This Revox is an attractive tuner. It reminds me of test equipment seen in the past. It has quite an interesting look which is much nicer than the basic black of many more modern digital tuners.

Some DX tests first On the weak college station at Both could only hold a mono signal. Needless to say, there were some were strange signal conditions during this review.

The Revox was very aggressive in choosing mono on all but the strongest of stations. On to the listening tests. The midrange was pleasant enough but slightly forward, as were the highs, plus the highs were not as smooth and controlled as the higher-rated tuners.

I was disappointed after the Revox B but then again, all Kenwoods and Sansuis are not sonically equal to their family members at the top of our list, either.

The LT never ceases to amaze me in how deep the bass goes, and with more punch than most tuners. As a matter of fact, this Technics reminds me of the Sumo Charlie, with its lower midrange hump that also gives an apparent sense of bass.

The higher frequencies of both tuners gave no problems during music playback. Although the LT sounded more "right" I saw no serious sonic sores on the challenger.

All in all, a pleasant sound, but I was less inclined to tap my foot while listening. The rack-mount styling and clean lines should attract those who favor this styling, me among them.

Therefore, in Auto, the tuner chooses when to switch to the narrow bandwidth. I hate not being in control. The ST had some interference problems with other stations, plus there was breakup of the signal on loud voice and music signals.

Neither tuner was listenable in stereo during these tests. The dial pointer was pretty far off, so take this review with a grain of salt.

I feel this tuner may be more out of alignment than most so far. Sanyo Plus T35 Winner: What is going on here? Is it legal for a Sanyo to sound this good?

This is a great-sounding tuner. It makes you want to just sit, close your eyes and listen. This Sanyo has that seductive characteristic.

The next Sanyo may not possess this magic. Just some thoughts I wanted to share before I dissect the sound. The sound, in toto, is tuneful, balanced and invites long listening sessions.

The bass, while not going to the bottom of the well, definitely got its feet wet. Bass punch and bloom had the same sonic character as the LT, if not the bottom reach.

While the LT has a very focused midrange, the Sanyo has a more laidback, slightly diffuse approach. This is the second Sanyo through here this year.

The first played on my work bench one day and then went crazy, throwing loads of RF, and never played music again. This Sanyo under review had trouble turning on this morning.

This Meridian has a clean, articulate midrange that always remained musically inviting. The bass is good and the highs are smooth and detailed, being neither recessed nor forward of the total package.

When thrown up against the LT, I think the perceived smoothness is partly the result of a less punchy, less full bass.

There appears to be less of an overall sense of dynamics. For that prize, a tuner must have deep bass, dynamics, natural highs and a pleasant, listenable midrange - that Class -C-, "does everything right" package that can take an FM devotee all the way there.

On DX and ergonomics, I was unable to force this tuner to stop on either of our weak test stations. It turned its British nose up at all but local stations with acceptable signals.

Want a good-looking, pleasant-sounding tuner? Most of the Shootout tuners reviewed are loans from a very small group of serious FM tuner collectors and TIC contributors, but once in a while I just have to buy one for myself.

I left the tuner on for a couple of days - as a matter of fact, it looks to be always on, but when you hit the mute switch, the display turns off.

The DX setting, when engaged, gave more signal strength bars on the display. Manual tuning is slow but you can memorize eight stations. A look inside showed a simple layout with a short audio signal path to the outputs.

The biggest difference compared to the LT was, as usual, a loss in bass punch. The rankings are getting very crowded and there are so many tuners in the Shootout list that are a cut above any mass-market also-ran.

There has been no real reason for me or my small band of tuner collectors and contributors to buy any real junk. As you know, some time ago I felt it was necessary to create the -C- class of tuners, for tuners that give us just about as much as we could really hope for in a stock tuner.

I always came away from my listening sessions very satisfied in that smallish -C- class group. The -C- group always has very good bass, great sound through the midrange, and sweet, non-fatiguing highs.

They always seem to give that extra little something. Now I feel it is time to create another class of very good tuners to follow the -C- class.

And what shall we call it? Those above average tuners that give us a good "-M-idrange," good bass and highs, but maybe not always in that rare, more seamless combination of everything that makes the -C- class just right.

I want to add that I feel most fortunate to be able to listen and review all these great tuners and it has definitely spoiled me. Seeking audio perfection can be very expensive!

Starting with this review, the -M- class tuners are identified on our list. There are a ton of great FM tuners out there and I hope each one of you can get to enjoy at least one.

Testing for DX on With both tuners in mono, narrow and the TS in its DX mode, I was able to hear good, clean signals. Switching both to stereo mode, the TS had the wider stereo spread with some faint background hiss.

Switching both to WIDE mode, the TS kept the stereo image but with more hiss and intermittent interference from When I returned to This was more noticeable on the TS The Sansui TU tuner is nothing more than a little dog in a big doghouse.

Sansui had a good marketing strategy way back when. In the TU-x17 series, there were five tuners: The underappreciated TU is basically a TU with minor differences.

Sometimes a good bargain to be had there. With the , you got a nice-sounding, slim for the time tuner. When you dished out more money for a , you got panel lights.

The , and are basically the same tuner. Now on the , you do get a bigger power transformer and a few added capacitors in the power supply, but the circuit board, circuit and even part identifications look to be identical in all three.

Rounding up the usual suspects for DX tests, there were no obvious problems on stations with good signal strength.

Where the TU stumbled was on the weakest local area stations. The TU has no narrow mode and was not able to hide from On our other weak station at The LT was in wide for this test.

It never ceases to amaze me how nice these old Sansuis sound. The imaging presented was slightly less focused and there was some loss of dynamic contrasts in the music.

The highs were also smooth and sweet, more so than the previously tested TU In solo listening tests, the differences faded as the music flowed from the TU What factors involved are just guesses but maybe, the bigger power transformer?

The extra capacitors in the power supply? By luck, a better set of filters? All in all, a fine showing. Accuse me of favoritism, will you? McDonald was killed instantly, and Dr.

Sparks was fatally wounded, however Captain Davis, an Army veteran, pulled out both of his pistols and killed seven of the bandits in quick order.

Out of bullets, Captain Davis, an expert fencer, pulled out his Bowie knife and killed four more of his attackers.

The surviving bandits fled for their lives. The shootout was witnessed by a group of miners, who buried the bodies of the dead.

Shooting broke out during a highly charged trial in the Cherokee Nation. They exchanged fire with the townspeople.

Two of the gang members were killed in the fire fight along with two innocent civilians. Legendary lawman Elfego Baca ignited an intense shootout with cowboys, depending on source, in Frisco now Reserve , New Mexico.

The Dalton Gang attempted to rob two banks simultaneously in Coffeyville, Kansas, only to find themselves ambushed by lawmen and armed townspeople before they could make their escape.

The gang was cornered in an alley and shot to pieces by the swarming townspeople; Emmett Dalton is the only outlaw to survive. In an attempt to free their friend, a criminal gang ambushed seven FBI agents and Kansas City police at the train station as they were escorting captured fugitive Frank Nash back to prison.

The FBI agents were unarmed, but the local police exchanged fire with the criminal gang. The gang unintentionally killed Nash along with the law officers.

Nelson pursued the FBI Agents, exchanging gunfire with them, until his car was disabled. Though Nelson was wounded seventeen times by the Agents, he and Chase were able to fatally injure both Hollis and Cowley.

Nelson escaped, only to die that evening from his injuries. Ordered to surrender, Fred opened fire; both he and his mother were killed by federal agents after an intense, hours-long shootout in a rented house.

Gangster Dutch Schultz and cronies battle with rival mobsters from Murder, Inc. Puerto Rican nationalists Oscar Collazo and Griselio Torresola got into a shootout with officers of the Capitol police and Secret Service while attempting to break into the Blair House and assassinate president Harry Truman.

By the end of the gun battle, Torresola and officer Leslie Coffelt were killed in an event that firearms instructor Massad Ayoob called "the boldest attempt at home invasion in modern history".

Charles Whitman barricaded himself at the top of the tower at the University of Texas at Austin and proceeded to fire randomly from the tower.

He eventually received return fire from police and armed civilians. He was killed in a final shootout when his perch was stormed by Austin police.

On April 6, , California Highway Patrol officers engaged heavily armed criminals Bobby Davis and Jack Twining in a shootout in the parking lot of a restaurant near Newhall, California.

In a span of five minutes, Davis and Twining killed four CHP officers, making it the deadliest day in the history of Californian law enforcement.

In an attempt to free his brother, imprisoned Black Panther leader George Jackson , year-old Jonathan Jackson entered a courthouse in Marin County, California with an arsenal of weapons.

After storming into a room where a trial was taking place, Jackson armed defendant James McClain, who was on trial for murdering a prison guard, and two fellow convicts who were participating in the trial as witnesses, William Christmas and Ruchell Magee.

The four armed men then took the judge, a district attorney and three jurors hostage, and marched them out of the courthouse into a waiting getaway van.

As they attempted to flee the scene, a shootout broke out between the hostage takers and Marin County Sheriffs deputies providing security at the courthouse.

According to the other hostages, Haley was executed by the hostage takers with a shotgun that had been taped to his throat. Magee was severely injured, but survived the battle and was sentenced to life in prison.

One juror and the D. One of the weapons used by Jackson was later traced to Black Panther icon Angela Davis , who was later tried but acquitted for participation in the crime.

It was later alleged by a Marin General Hospital doctor that Judge Haley was being treated for a brain tumor and should have been recused from trying cases for health reasons.

This remains one of the largest police shootouts in history with a reported total of over 9, rounds being fired 5, by police, 4, by the SLA.

Every round fired by SLA members at the police missed the officers. During the incident, police fired tear gas into the house, unintentionally starting a fire.

All six SLA members were killed, either by police bullets or the fire. The massacre took place at 2: A longstanding feud between two rival Chinatown gangs , the Joe Boys and Wah Ching , came to a head when a botched assassination attempt by the Joe Boys at the restaurant led to 5 civilians, including 2 tourists, being killed, and 11 others injured.

MOVE was a back-to-nature, anti-technology group in Philadelphia , Pennsylvania in the s and s. They were involved in two shootouts with the Philadelphia police.

August 8, , Powelton Village. During an attempt to forcibly remove the group from the home in which they were living, a shootout took place between the police and the group; one police officer was killed.

Nine of the group members were tried and sentenced for murder. May 13, , Osage Avenue. About 10, rounds of ammunition were fired by the police.

The police dropped a bomb on the house, starting a fire which burned down 62 houses and killed 11 people.

Prolonged shootout and chase between police in Norco, California, and five heavily armed bank robbers wearing military-style fatigues and armed with assault rifles , thousands of rounds of hollow-point bullets as well as various explosive and incendiary devices.

Police responded to a bank robbery call in Norco. Upon arriving the police were ambushed and outgunned.

After the robbers unloaded over rounds at police cruisers, the officers were forced to retreat behind their cruisers or nearby obstacles, all the while being fired upon.

The suspects attempted to escape in their own vehicle. During this attempt, the driver of the suspects was killed by a stray police shot.

The suspects then hijacked a nearby vehicle and became involved in a prolonged chase, in which the suspects shot at police and disabled and destroyed 33 police vehicles as well as civilian cars with explosives thrown from the back of a truck.

Learn more More Like This. A house with a dark history. Lone Star Deception The Debt I Edit Cast Credited cast: Officer Charlie Kj Smith Officer Michael Sydney Graham Young Swag Jordyn Burrell Edit Details Official Sites:

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Shootouts - where

Der Eintrag wurde im Forum gespeichert. Für fast vier Minuten ist der Ton nur der von hämmernden Maschinengewehren und Schrotflinten, die Musik verstummt. Der Torwart darf den Strafraum nicht verlassen, wenn er pariert, ist es vorbei. Wir erhalten für einen Kauf über unseren Link eine kleine Provision und können so die kostenlos nutzbare Webseite teilweise mit diesen Einnahmen finanzieren. Never touch a running [ Lehmann When we practice penalty shootouts , I gathered information beforehand, and Wie sie die im Dunkeln tappenden Gangster ausschaltet und ihren blind gefeuerten Kugeln entgeht.

shootouts - speaking

Fussball Ist der Satz so korrekt in Englisch? Dann sollte auch endlich mal der Videobeweis eingeführt werden um die grandiosen Fehlentscheidungen zu reduzieren. John Woo zeigt sich als Meister inszenierter Shootouts. Oder hättet ihr gerne andere Kandidaten an deren Stelle gesehen? Was haltet ihr von den präsentierten Shootouts? Diese Beispiele können umgangssprachliche Wörter, die auf der Grundlage Ihrer Suchergebnis enthalten. Ein Gegner könnte einen Schuss überlebt haben? Dabei entgeht er wie auf magische Weise jeder Kugel, trifft perfekt und sieht dabei richtig cool aus. Das klingt natürlich in beschriebener Form sehr langweilig. Das Licht in dieser Szene spielt verrückt, ähnlich einem Stroboskop wechselt es von dunkel zu hell, mit jeder abgefeuerten Kugel. The only advantage the LT seemed to have was its ability to fine tune, because of its infinitely variable capacitor, as opposed to the FX which can tune in 50 kHz steps only - postleitzahl 48 than most digital tuners which tend to tune in. I have owned four or five of these tuners, dating back 12 or so years. This power hungry monster uses 13 thirteen! The sound, in snooker wm live stream, is tuneful, balanced and invites long listening sessions. On casual listening, the Philips was very close in its sonic signature to bayern sevilla rückspiel LT. Both tuners shootouts able to pick up Later in the night they engaged in kostenlose online games jetzt shootout with officers in Watertown, Massachusetts where they injured 16 officers one of them fatally and Tamerlan Tsarnev was killed while Dzhokhar Tsarnev was arrested the next day. The Nak did handle the birdie problems on The biggest difference compared to the LT was, as usual, a loss in bass punch. The LT by a song and a prayer. There are Kenwood tuners from the base of this growing mountain of tuners to the very peak. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was later convicted for bombing the Marathon, and was sentenced to death.

The lower midrange and bass are warm and seem to invite long listening sessions. There is better than average front-to-back depth.

The B has slightly more background hiss than either the LT or the TU-X1, but all in all, it was an enjoyable listening experience. After long listening sessions, I thought the highs were a little too much of a good thing, but I can understand someone liking this total sound package.

DXing weak and distant stations showed the Revox to be no match for the LT. The soundstage has a flat, one-dimensional presentation. Instruments and voices appear to be lined up in a single row, left to right, forward of the speakers.

The bass has a flat, one-note quality to it and the treble, while not harsh, is more pronounced than it should be yes, the exaggerated sibilance is there.

It was more bland than irritating. DXing was a pleasant surprise in the fact that weak stations were captured by both tuners.

The did have much more noise and problems from strong nearby stations, though. Both tuners were able to pick up Winner and still audio champ?

This is one of the few attractive tuners built during the transition from the beauty of analog to the black box sameness that haunts us to this day.

Sorry, but I feel better for having said that - JMO. The bass was full and rich, and I enjoyed the difference compared to most other tuners in the survey.

The bass had a full, slower but extended sound compared to the tight punch but deep sound of the LT. The highs had a slightly forward sound that somewhat took away from the total package.

The overall soundstage was forward of the speakers with good front-to-rear apparent depth. I was more impressed than I expected to be and give it a high rating.

When pointed East to The LT was able to get through to Next up, the Kenwood KT The has a sonic signature that focuses on the midrange.

Maybe a good thing for talk radio programs, but not for music. The bass has a shy, one-note quality, a fairly focused midrange and fairly bright, forward highs.

If any nice old tuner ever begged for a makeover in the audio stage, this is the one. The difference between it and the LT made me want to hurry this shootout to a finish.

Even to ring the bell early and declare the champ, still the champ. If any nice old tuner ever begged for a makeover in the audio stage, the KT is the one.

All the way from Norway, the Tandberg A is an attractive tuner. Its black face and silver knobs blend well with its red and cream lighting.

I found the short dial very distracting after using wall-to-wall tuning indicators on Sansuis and Kenwoods for so long. I never had the feeling that I was tuning a station precisely using this truncated system.

The A is a nice-sounding tuner with some interesting tonal characteristics. The treble was sweet and never irritated. The lower midrange through the treble had a lighter presentation to the sound compared to the LT.

The A had very good imaging and the ability to help me imagine that I was in the audience. The bass was good but gave just a hint of running out of gas compared to the LT.

Listened to alone, it was very nice. Still, I give the A high marks for its pleasant musicality. Magnum Dynalab FT Winner: The LT was tag-teamed this week by two brothers.

The revisions are in the audio circuit, as well as slight cosmetic changes. It consists of a dual op-amp buffer that sees the audio signal from an LM From the , the signal goes to two smallish 4.

Another way to try to explain is that the LT is more natural-sounding. Against the LT the whole presentation from top to bottom had a lighter sound.

The bass had less punch. Listening to it by itself, it was a very pleasant sound. Winner and still champion: Next up, the Luxman T This little tuner left me in shock.

My younger days saw all kinds of meters bouncing and flashing at home, in the movies, etc. I hooked up the Luxman, sat down to listen and got back up thinking I was listening to the LT.

No, it was the Luxman! This is a very good-sounding tuner. After listening for a couple of days, here are my findings.

A very pleasant sound, top to bottom. The T gave up a little richness in tone quality to the LT in bass. The T also has the potential to be a good tuner for DXing.

Using narrow band and switching from kHz tuning steps to 25 kHz steps on the rear of the tuner, I was able to pull in On other stations, too, the two tuners seemed to be neck-and-neck in pulling power.

Overall, though, the LT still wears the crown. The Fanfare FT-1A is an attractive tuner that has that high-end audio look. The highs were not irritating and the bass lacked punch.

Considering this tuner is so much newer than the others, I left it on for a few days to warm up. I tried the low-gain output and that tamed the midrange somewhat, but the bass was still not impressive.

DXing against the LT was a no-go, too. For example, pointing west toward It was so directional grabbing the signal in narrow that I used it to mark my rotor for an exact alignment toward Pointing toward the east at The Fanfare was swamped by nearby Again the winner of the shootout is the LT.

Normally, the Shootouts are for stock tuners only. Although Fanfare obviously thinks that the silver wiring improves the sound or else why would they offer it?

A couple sounded thin and bright, but most sounded pretty good. This one sounds pretty darn good! The bass is slightly tubby-sounding compared to the LT but still a pleasant, rich sound.

The midrange is realistic and the front-to-rear imaging is very good. The soundstage is slightly forward of the speakers compared to the LT.

All in all, the was a most enjoyable listen. I give it a high rating and now want to modify one. I am very impressed with its sound compared to the more expensive toys.

Please remember that none of these shootout tuners have seen an alignment in years, as far as I know, with the possible exception being the Mac MR I veered from the shootout format to see which one really had the better sound in a one-on-one while the LT slept.

To have a little fun, I had my wife plug in the RCAs and set the volume of the variable output of the Sansui to match the fixed output of the Luxman.

Tuner A had a slightly richer bass and the imaging was excellent. Tuner B gave a sweeter presentation to the music and the imaging was very good.

It could come down to the music being played. For classical, jazz, etc. If you could take the best qualities of both and put them together, you would be very close to the LT, I think.

It really hurts to publish this but I would ultimately choose the Luxman between these two. Time for some upgrades! The display is a dull yellow-orange, a neat trick Technics accomplished with an orange plastic screen over your typical dull blue VCR-type readout.

The face is a no-frills, clean, dark military greenish-brown. Left to right, the controls are Power, Station Selector, Mode, Auto Hi-Blend, two pushbuttons marked Up and Down to scroll for a station, and finally an analog-type knob for tuning.

His system there consists of large Jeff Rowland Design Group Model 7 amps and Coherence 1 preamp with Hales speakers - very different from my homemade 7-watt triodes and small JMlab speakers.

I continuously chose the Luxman over the Technics in a blind listening test, but Jesse leaned toward the Technics. The bass of both was very close, very close.

The treble was smooth and controlled, again close to the sweetness of the LT. The height and depth of the soundstage was smaller.

They will deliver whatever good ancillary hi-fi equipment can dish out. I give this little tuner a high ranking, but the winner is still the LT.

Well, I had to know. Was there something special inside the ST? First, it was a pain to get into - pretty tricky, and the ribbon cable is soldered in so you have to be very careful in there.

The something special I found was a very short signal path from the audio op-amp to the output jacks, followed by bipolar 3. These were not directly in the signal path.

The not-so-special was the op-amp and steel leads in the coupling caps. I think the short and sweet signal path was part of the magic at the lows and highs, but the op-amp caused the not-so-wonderful midrange when the ST was thrown up against the LT or the Luxman T Naim NAT 01 Winner: This is an older, two-piece tuner.

The tuner is the Naim NAT It also takes the signals from these same three and sends one to a proper preamp via switching controls on the front.

The tuner can also bypass this switching and go direct to your preamp, which is how I listened. The midrange was more one-dimensional and had a diffuse sound to it.

The soundstage was taller than the LT and more laidback meaning more to the rear of the speakers. The highs, as said, were non-fatiguing.

There are NO controls on this model: And it drifts off channel from time to time. It tries so hard not to offend and for that reason it did. This is a very attractive tuner, for a digital.

A inch rack mount, gold tone, black handles and pushbuttons, colorful display, serial no. I was a little worried when this one was presented to me for review.

Many tuner fans reading this know there are some very polarized opinions on the Charlie - some think there is nothing better, some hate it.

I found nothing that really irritated, and there is a midbass punch that will attract you. Going into the upper midrange and treble, the Charlie never irritated as some tuners do with spit or sibilance.

Maybe to a fault. This may be one area where the LT gets some of its lifelike excitement. This has become a good test to pit the sensitivity of other tuners against the LT.

The F is a very upscale-looking tuner - gold accents, orange display, and polished-looking wood side panels. Well, this was a tough one.

And that is still my impression. The F has an articulate midrange, and the treble is more forward but not irritating. In my small listening room, I preferred the LT.

Emails with certain members of the group forced me to put a little extra effort into this one. On music, this presented deeper bass and a more extended, forward treble.

In a large room, in a big sound system, I might choose this Pioneer over the LT. I put it below the KT on the overall list for my small listening room choices.

I was so impressed by the sound of the Technics ST that I bought an ST on eBay to see if I could get away with, hopefully, a cheaper version.

When it comes to sound, you could do much worse. The eagle-eyed among you might catch that these two Technics outgunned the Kenwood KT, which uses the same audio op-amp.

Also, the has no mechanical switching along that path. The result is a noticable improvement in sound through design, whether intentional or accidental.

You can also forget the class A bias mod on this model because of this power supply. I plan to experiment with better op-amp and capacitor choices soon - keep tuned in.

Winner of this shootout: Good looks and cheap. This straightforward little guy has only 3 gangs and 2 filters, no bells and no whistles. DXing of weak stations was good when the APS-9 was pointed directly at the station.

On the weakest signals, there was more background noise compared to the LT. On spoken voices DJs and commercials , you can hear extra sibilance compared to the LT.

All things taken into account, I was very impressed - a very enjoyable sound in an inexpensive tuner for those with a good antenna, or at least close, strong, good FM stations.

Also the TU, with the exception of one I once had that sounded thin may have been out of alignment. Anyone who likes this look and likes good sound, but is budget-minded, should shop here.

I rated the low only because it does need a good signal for a quieter background. Winner of the shootout: Nikko Gamma V Winner: Another nice digital tuner.

My old girlfriend, Anna Log, is very jealous. An old friend of mine from work bought a new truck and we took our ladies "antiquing" in it.

In his new truck is a real nice stereo. He keeps the bass and treble cranked all the way up and loves the sound that way.

At the end of the day, I had a real headache. Just a little note as this review begins and the first thing you hear is Comparing the two reminded me of the difference between the first generation Infinity EMIT ribbon tweeters and the last ones made.

Both were good tweeters, IMO, but the delicate highs presented in the last series were the best. Winner of the shootout, the LT.

The circuit board is accessible from the top and bottom. There is a relay after the the op-amp. I have no schematic to confirm these observations.

Some DX observations across the dial: Worth, lots of noise in stereo on the Nikko, while the LT was fine, with both tuners in narrow mode.

A big name for a big tuner. Not much inside, though - it looks like a kit that a pre-teen could build. The overall sound reminded me of the Kenwood KT, but thank goodness the Phase Linear did sound better.

I never felt the need to turn it down. The soundstage favored the midrange but was pleasant enough. It did have bass but it was somewhere between running out of gas and running on empty.

You get a thump instead of feeling the bass as in the LT. All in all, the sound was pleasant and not irritating except for the bass presentation.

This model has a dynamic range expander switch that gives 0 db, 4 db or 9 db of expansion. At first, all I noticed was that everything got louder, but the more I worked with it, the more I got the feeling that it made the music kind of shout at me.

DX results showed the Phase Linear capturing my test stations on This power hungry monster uses 13 thirteen! Sixty watts probably was coming from these lamps.

A note on the surprisingly pleasant sound: Inside, I see only film caps along the audio path, with no electrolytics between the MPX chip, audio stage and output.

Now, I wonder if I pulled about half those lamps and beefed up the power supply? Would the bass come into its own? This time around we have a very attractive Pioneer.

The TXII gave a clean sonic presentation. Silibance was not irritating, and the midrange was articulate and pleasant.

Imaging was good but lacked the sense of depth of the LT. Where the TXII stumbled was in the lower midrange and bass area. The LT consistently gave more body to the music and a sense of power in the bass.

The audio amp is a multi-function leg PA A quick look at the service manual invites some possible DIY improvements. The final sound of the II gave a more fleshed-out midrange and an even sweeter treble.

Worth, west of me, and On this rainy afternoon the II held its own, capturing On another day, swinging the APS-9 toward the east on The LT was able to dig through the muck and grab some classical music, weakly, but the Pioneer could capture nothing at It has really brought in more stations with less noise for me.

To summarize, the TX impressed, but the winner, as before, is the LT. This shootout will be longer than most as I give more information on the weak DX test stations.

The scope can also be used for fine tuning. The intense blue lighting of the dial and scope contrasting against the red indicators will appeal to many.

Rotating my APS-9 antenna around the area gave these results. Looking northwest to And on one particular night, I had to stop testing and listen to some really good jazz for an hour.

Sometimes, you just get lucky. In the same direction is another weak station at I was picking up more noise on the Marantz here.

Next, I turned the antenna west, to the low-powered Texas Christian University station, Capturing an acceptable signal here has been a good test for the shootout tuners.

Surprisingly, both tuners did well on this night of DX tests. There was a cloud cover which may have helped. The Marantz had much more noise in wide mode that the LT did in wide.

Searching directly east, I could grab Maybe this summer I can relocate my antenna system to avoid facing into the giant tree in our yard.

I really want to open up the signal path toward east Texas. It was jazz week while testing these two and I tripped over another college station at As far as sound quality goes, the Marantz had a forward, one-dimensional sound.

While never irritating or unpleasant, the midrange and treble had a light tonal quality that never made me forget that I was listening to a radio.

There was also more hiss in the background with weak or problem signals compared to the LT. On the plus side, the Marantz pulled in the hard-to-grab college stations in narrow mode but not as cleanly as the LT.

The LT easily won this one-on-one shootout. The Kenwood KT was a pleasant surprise. This time around, I had the chance to listen to two stock s and found no real unit-to-unit differences.

It was an enjoyable experience throughout the listening sessions. I expected sound close to the KT that I rated so low, mainly because the KT uses the same op-amp at the output, but not so!

The differences in circuitry upstream must be doing the trick. Against my standard LT, the soundstage presented itself slightly in front of the speakers from the upper midrange through the treble.

The dynamics that I found missing in the KT were there in the and made listening to music more enjoyable throughout the tests.

The imaging of the was precise and pinpoint, not slightly diffuse like the TU-X1. Maybe as part of the slightly "forward" upper range, you lose some of the three-dimensional sound quality found in the LT.

On the plus side, the had more front-to-rear depth than the or even the KT Bass was good and dynamics were surprisingly good. The sibilance was there, but mild, and not as bad as on some previous test tuners.

Tests on weak stations around the dial showed the KT to be a good DX machine. Weak stations on Listening in on the weakest local station at The was definitely noisier than the LT, both in wide and narrow mode.

Strangely, there was some noise always present with either tuner That sounds like a dirty or well-used record.

In wide mode, both tuners heard noise and interference from Not so with the Overall, as nice a tuner as the KT is, the LT must come out on top again.

This time we have the black version of the AH I was apprehensive about the touch controls, which seemed like a gimmick waiting to go wrong, but they worked flawlessly throughout the time the tuner was in my system.

Time to cut to the chase. This is a wonderful-sounding tuner. I listened for hours without any thought of sonic faults. On casual listening, the Philips was very close in its sonic signature to the LT.

I had to spend a lot of time to squeeze out any differences between the two tuners. There was just a hint of more bass extension from the LT, impossible to notice without long listening sessions and an aural magnifying glass.

More noticeable was the added "life" in the highs. If other samples sound this good, I highly recommend this tuner in stock form. It usually stayed as quiet as the Kenwood, but lost its large stereo soundstage.

There is obviously a high-blend type circuit causing the collapse of the soundstage, probably the "automatic noise canceling circuit," which is actually not a bad thing to keep the signal quiet.

To sum up, with a strong signal present, the two tuners fought an even battle. On weaker stations, the LT proved to be a slightly better all-around tuner.

Nonetheless, the Philips is highly recommended as a great music machine. It looks pretty neat. In fact, it dazzles. There are no glaring, unpleasant sonic problems.

What I did hear or actually, did not hear, were low-level details in the music. Ambiance and low-level detail were diminished compared to the LT.

As a matter of fact, the more I listened, the more I was reminded of the pleasant sound presented by the Sequerra Model 1. You lose some bass and gain some treble extension with the SAE, but I do hear a mini-Sequerra in there.

Turn it on late at night, choose a nice wine and enjoy the tunes. And here is a nice benefit of owning one: There was more background noise on the weaker stations compared to the LT, but not as bad as some tuners in the shootouts.

This tuner is the second of the the shootout contestants to have a known, good alignment, thanks to Bob. Nothing has been modified and no parts have been changed.

Fortunately, it sounds better than the first aligned tuner, the Mac MR As usual, there were no noticeable problems at It held the signal fairly steady in narrow.

Going degrees away from KTCU on The sound presented during the listening tests to this weak signal showed up as harsh sputter as the F tried its best to grab and hold onto the signal.

I had hoped for better DX performance from the F because, for some strange reason, I like the looks of this tuner. Now for the sound.

Here, we get to smile again. In treble sweetness, extension and ambient information, this is the second shootout tuner that, I feel, outperforms the LT - the first being the Philips AH These two tuners just get it right in the treble.

Boy, if I could tack this ability onto the already wonderful sounding LT As far as the midrange goes, both the F and LT held up well with articulate, focused images.

The only area where the F disappointed was in the lower midrange. That being said, the bass itself was nice and punchy on my system. I need to stop here to express how impossible this job would be without the LT being used as our standard, my benchmark for sonic neutrality and musicality.

The job could still be done but I would probably have less defined increments of sonic neutrality to post. Maybe it would be more of a clumping, something like "these seven sound good, but these nine I could live without," etc.

Magnum Dynalab MD Winner: They forced me to put this drop-dead gorgeous Magnum Dynalab tuner in my system and demanded that I listen to it. As before, the volume level was set to closely match the two tuners through the midrange.

Because we can try different output tubes, this can be a chameleon of a tuner. The typical buyer will most likely be tempted to do some "tube-rolling" and I, as the reviewer, was no different.

The stock tubes were not available for use as one arrived broken shipped from a third party, not from Magnum Dynalab.

The first tubes tried were two smooth plate Telefunkens. After warm-up and settling in, I first noticed a midrange with excellent lifelike imaging.

The lifelike quality of voice and instruments made me sit up and listen. On some recordings of female voice, there was a feeling that the singer was in the room.

This was quite a surprise as I had expected a more lush "tube-like" sonic presentation in the lower ranges.

Before the arrived, my assumptions were it would have a Mac MR 67 or Marantz 10B-type sound quality. Did Magnum go out of their way not to overdo the "tube sound"?

But when I tried a pair of s marked Sylvania, I heard a change for the better. The lower midrange fleshed out somewhat, the bass seemed fuller, and there was some taming of the high frequencies.

A very nice sound but, unfortunately, still not my favorite among the shootout tuners. I wish I had a pair of RCA black plates available for more tube-rolling.

When I looked inside I noticed two. Some people say they give more detail but to me, they always give a lighter, brighter sound to the music.

I believe these caps create "detail" not originally in the music. Would I finally fall in love? Maybe, but in the meantime, the LT wins again.

I give the MD a high rating, mostly because of the excellent midrange presentation. Turning to DX qualities The Magnum Dynalab has three IF bandwidths.

While rotating the antenna around the DFW area I was impressed by the stiff competition between these two tuners. On our weak station, Worth, both held on pretty well in wide mode and both were listenable and enjoyable in narrow.

There was more background hiss in the MD but more interference from One reason may have been that hailstorms tore half the leaves off the giant magnolia tree in our backyard and the APS-9 had a much cleaner line of sight.

No new problems were noticed from either tuner on the other usual DX experiments and neither tuner came out the clear DX winner.

Another dream tuner for the budget-conscious. Another tuner that sounds great stock. That makes my job of reviewing just that much harder.

I want to listen to some bad-sounding tuners soon - well, maybe just one. This slim black Sansui has a very articulate midrange with good imaging.

There have been somewhere between 50 and nice-sounding tuners that have found a temporary home in my audio system since the formation of TIC.

Many of these tuners have been digital. Tuners that tweak crazies like me could just leave alone, if that were possible. At the time of this writing I would be able to live with the top 13, if I had to, without mods.

The DXing was as follows. The TU-D99X picked up nearby weak stations when the antenna was correctly positioned. It and the LT both picked up To the northwest, Pointing east on The LT ignored As a matter of fact, I caught myself listening instead of reviewing quite often.

The faults I found were faults of omission rather than any glaring problems. This sample of the T-2 had a lot of drift, which lasted for a good 5 minutes after turn-on.

I wonder if this is a common problem with this model? After matching the volume of the two tuners through the midrange, I got the following sonic results.

When cranking it up, the bass energy in the room went deeper with the LT - more palpable, to use an overused audiophile term. There was a slight loss of harmonic richness to instruments in the T-2 compared to the LT.

I first noticed this with the strum of an acoustic guitar. The highs, although never unpleasant, were a little more pronounced.

Again, I must say the differences were subtle but noticeable in side-by-side testing. Spinning the FM antenna around the area gave these results.

Our true test at Now here was a shock: On this day, the LT was intermittently swamped by Going to narrow mode on the LT reversed the results and the Kenwood gave a better signal than the Yamaha.

Both came in with good stereo lock but the Yamaha had more noticeable background noise. Going degrees out from The Yamaha had trouble in any configuration, being swamped by There have been quite a few more desirable tuners reviewed in these shootouts, but this Yamaha may very well be THE cutoff tuner between the keepers and the also-rans.

I have an interesting history with the FT series of MD tuners. I have owned four or five of these tuners, dating back 12 or so years.

The most expensive one was an Etude, a demo unit that I bought from a high-end store. The first one was the most pleasant-sounding of the bunch, and the Etude was the brightest-sounding of the bunch.

Now on to the Etude under test. There was nothing objectionable in this sample from the low bass through the highs. It was a pleasant enough sound throughout.

Pitting the Etude against the LT gave the following results. The LT had a richer, warmer sound from the bass through the lower midrange.

This Etude sample should satisfy most listeners. For a real jump in sound quality, however, the audio op-amp should be upgraded. There is room inside.

Even in narrow mode the Etude had the cleaner signal. Swinging the antenna degrees to the east but leaving the tuners centered on Yes, I did fiddle with the dial to fine tune the stations.

The Etude seems to be more sensitive but not as selective as the LT. On our other test stations on Being suspicious of my first results, I revisited the DX tests on different days and nights as well.

The results were always consistent except I noticed that the LT sometimes had a quieter background. One note of interest is KOAI, at This station almost always has more background noise than other strong stations, as well as noise problems in general.

The LT was able to keep the background noise quieter than the Etude, but keep in mind that this has almost always been the case when other tuners were under test.

After the review, this sample will go under the knife soldering iron in the hopes of making it a better tuner.

On KTCU, our weakest local channel, both tuners were able to grab and hold a usable signal in narrow. The Realistic was noisier and the stereo light would occasionally flicker.

On the other weak stations used as tests, there were no real problems. On the always problematic This little guy was also a pleasant surprise in the sound department, at least when a strong signal was present.

The highs were sweet and never irritated. You had to dial very slowly and gingerly to stop on a station. The one now under review is no better: On the strongest stations, the sound was good, with good bass through the highs.

The sound was more diffuse than the LT, which has great imaging. Not recommended - lowest overall rating so far. The creme de la creme, if you will, that really defy me placing one above the other.

This "cream" deserves a special mark but they have to do everything right, even if they sound slightly different from one another. They must have deep bass, an articulate, pleasant-sounding midrange, and sweet, non-irritating highs.

The -C- will be strictly for sound, while the old order may include other thoughts and observations. I could tell from the first time I turned on the B that this was going to be a good fight.

This Revox has a rich, full bass, while the midrange was very lifelike and a pleasure to sink into. A definite improvement over the highs of the Revox B reviewed above.

The whole sound was slightly more diffuse than the sound presented by the LT. It was a very close match between the two as far as musical enjoyment, and the final decision came only after hours of listening to both.

Things are getting real tight at the top as more good tuners are brought into this shootout. Turning to the DX track, at The Revox has no wide and narrow but did catch and hold the signal with much more noise.

Switching to mono helped very little. There was no jazz to be heard on The ReVox was able to control the background noise as well as the LT on Could there be more than one path to audio bliss from these tuners?

Just a few thoughts after listening to so many tuners in my role as reviewer. They had the same low, lush, powerful bass.

The imaging was excellent on both, they were both very three-dimensional in their presentations, the highs were sweet and never fatiguing, and I could listen to either of them for hours.

It took me a very long time to come up with any sonic differences. Female voice and highs were just a touch lighter with the TU, or should I say the LT was a touch darker-sounding?

The differences were very, very slight. At times, while listening to female vocals, I imagined she stepped off the stage and sang to just me through the Kenwood but stepped back on the stage and sang to everyone at my "table" through the Sansui.

Just an image of the slight differences. The technical side of me was disturbed that it was so hard to tell them apart.

Why do they sound so similar? The planets were aligned just right? Whatever, the LT may have met its match. When it came to the torture test at With both tuners in wide mode, the Sansui was more consistent in holding onto a quieter signal.

In narrow mode, both tuners held a cleaner signal but the Sansui had more occasional noise as its stereo light flickered. Manually switching both tuners to mono brought the different RF games these boys were playing under the same set of rules and after that, they fought to a draw.

Thanks to good tropospheric conditions, both tuners could pick up To sum up, the TU is highly recommended. The LT by a song and a prayer. That being said, if push came to shove, I could easily switch out the two and make the Sansui king.

I like the sound and wonder just how far it could be pushed. The outside is very attractive, which is something I find hard to get right on a digital tuner.

It is wide, low and has an pleasant, understated display. There seems to be two op-amps along the audio path with capacitors that should be easy to upgrade, also.

Time to order some parts. Some DX thoughts first. On most stations, both tuners had signals that were clean, quiet and pleasant to listen to.

On the swing test, turning the roof antenna toward the east but staying on The DX tests again showed the same song, different tuner. These tuners have a somewhat similar sonic signature.

The differences were subtle but there. While listening one-on-one, it was a most enjoyable time and if other samples sound this nice, the ST-J88B is another one I can recommend.

The midrange was a little forward but pleasant, and there were no problems in the treble region. Recommended, but the winner is still the LT.

When trying to capture KTCU The Nak did handle the birdie problems on Both tuners were able to receive the other test stations with quiet, trouble-free signals.

Speaking of quiet, this Nak has the Schotz noise-reduction circuit. Well, it works, I guess. I had to WORK to hear it work, though. With the APS-9 hooked up, I had a very hard time finding a station that was noisy.

I unhooked my main antenna and stuck in an 8-inch piece of wire. The Nak was able to pick up most every station I normally hear but they automatically switched to mono and stayed very quiet.

Pretty impressive, in a way, but I still had no noise for the Schotz to kill. I then hooked up a Godar indoor antenna. Now we were getting stereo signals on SOME stations.

I was able to find only two stereo signals with enough noise to use the Schotz circuit, and it did diminish that background noise.

IMO, not much of a gimmick to spend your money on. Buy yourself a good FM antenna for the roof or attic instead. While the bass went deep, it had a sort of muffled sound to it.

At times, I noticed the extreme highs to be somewhat rolled off in comparison to the LT. Such a pretty face, such a beautiful chassis, but does she have inner beauty?

Is her beauty only skin deep? It is my habit of late, when testing new tuners, to plug them in and let them "cook" for a couple of days.

The LT sees almost daily usage and some of these tuners may have sat for months. I also go in and clean the variable caps and switches in analog tuners.

Kind of a tune r up before the big race. The names of these two Kenwoods are close and confusing so I will call them king and maiden for this Shootout.

I trust you know which one the present king is. During listening tests, it was apparent that the king still squeezed out the last measure of bass over the maiden.

The soundstage of our maiden was more forward but was never unpleasant sounding. When listening to her sing all alone while the king slept, I forgot about his virtues and enjoyed the experience.

And so, the maiden did turn out to be more than just another pretty face and she does have a beautiful voice to go along with her good looks.

The lamp flickers but this almost disappears when fine-tuning the antenna. Our maiden held a steady stereo signal but at the cost of slightly more background hiss.

This was only noticed during quiet passages and brief periods of dead air. The maiden, however had trouble holding off the advances of the I think she may be due a fresh alignment.

The medium to high-signal stations were well received by both king and maiden alike. The once and future king, the LT. So many lights and buttons.

At least I can tell how it sounds. The bass, though deep, did not have that extra slam of the top tuners. In the final analysis, I would sum up the sound as pleasant, articulate, but lacking the dynamics of some of the boys at the top.

Most of my serious listening judgments are formed while tuned into local stations with strong signals. It was interesting to see how aggressive the TII was in deciding when to activate the narrow modes, hi-blend, etc.

Along with this automatic protection, the soundstage, imaging and "life" to the music were dulled, if not lost. When manually switching to wide mode and turning off the blend circuit on stations with fair signal strength, I was able to recapture the music with little or no noise.

The auto controls were first noticed when tuning to I sat down and was surprised how dull the sound had become compared to the LT.

Manual switching brought it back to life and with a clean background. To handicap the tuners and be fair, I switched the LT to auto and left it in narrow mode.

On antenna input A, I had been listening to There is probably degrees difference. With the tuner still at A very sensitive tuner indeed.

Pointing the antenna more accurately, the LT was able to capture this signal but with more noise. The II was also able to capture and hold this weak signal through a wider degree of antenna travel than the LT.

I should stop here and give some information on station distances from my house. There are about 70 stations within 70 miles, about 30 within 40 miles and 21 stations planted at the antenna farm, Both tuners liked the signal on this day but only in narrow.

Four of the robbers were arrested during their escape attempt, and more than six other people involved were arrested in subsequent investigations over the next several years.

The last arrest was made in After 30 hours of negotiations, a Memphis Police assault team raided the house and shot and killed Sanders and six of his followers, after which they found the body of Officer Hester beaten to death.

Tax protester Gordon Kahl traded shots with U. Marshals when they attempted to arrest him in Medina, North Dakota. Gordon Kahl was killed in a shootout with federal agents and the local sheriff in Smithville, Arkansas , in the house where he was hiding out.

The event became one of the most famous shootouts in American history, with 10 participants 8 FBI agents and two suspects , roughly rounds fired, and four deaths.

It took a total of 18 hits 6 on Matix, 12 on Platt to bring the gun battle to an end. From to , Los Angeles watch merchant Lance Thomas was involved in four shootouts with armed robbers.

In those four events, he killed a total of five and wounded another, while also being shot a total of five times. Thomas survived each shootout without permanent injuries, but eventually chose to close his store to avoid further bloodshed.

Marshals armed with sniper rifles and Ms shot it out with survivalist Randy Weaver and his family in the wilderness near Bonners Ferry, Idaho.

February 28—April 19, Heavily armed members of the Branch Davidian sect engaged federal agents of the BATF in an intense firefight during a raid of their compound building, initiating a day siege by the FBI near Waco, Texas.

The only deaths were the two bank robbers, Larry Eugene Phillips, Jr. On August 19, , Carl Drega, a New Hampshire resident who had long been in conflict with the government over alleged land code violations, opened fire on NH state trooper Scott Phillips after he was pulled over for a routine traffic stop.

After this, Drega drove home to set his house on fire, then drove to Vermont where he opened fire and critically injured a Vermont trooper who had followed him after identifying the stolen NH police car.

Eventually, Drega abandoned the vehicle at a Vermont farmhouse and ambushed a group of law enforcement officers from multiple agencies who had been sent to track him down.

During the massacre, school shooters Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold exchanged fire with Denver police three times.

Although 12 students and one teacher died, 21 others were injured and both the shooters committed suicide that day, no officers were killed or injured.

Estrada was shot in the head and died; her son was shot in the leg but recovered. Arroyo began trading gunfire with the officers, who were armed only with pistols, and forced them to retreat, wounding several of them.

Afterward, Arroyo jumped in his pickup and led police on a high-speed chase, exchanging gunfire along the way. Arroyo was eventually shot and killed by a responding officer armed with a CAR rifle.

July 10, , Los Angeles, California. Barnaby and one of the officers were killed, and another officer was injured. Gun dealer Ronald Wedge was found guilty of selling a gun to Barnaby illegally, and was sentenced to ten months in prison.

On March 21, , four Oakland police officers and the suspect were killed in a shootout. A shootout occurred on April 4, , at Fairfield Street in the Stanton Heights neighborhood of Pittsburgh , Pennsylvania , United States, stemming from an argument over a dog urinating in the house between a mother and her year-old son.

Three police officers were ultimately confirmed dead, and another two were seriously injured. Poplawski was armed with a semi-automatic AK -style rifle and two other guns, protected by a bulletproof vest, and had been lying in wait for the officers.

According to police and witnesses, he held police at bay for four hours as the fallen officers were left bleeding nearby, their colleagues unable to reach them.

More than rounds were fired by the SWAT teams and Poplawski, who surrendered after suffering a gunshot wound to the leg.

Poplawski was later convicted of capital murder and was sentenced to death. One gunman Maurice Clemmons entered the coffee shop, fired at the officers as they sat working on their laptop computers, and then fled the scene.

After a 2-day manhunt that spanned several cities in the Puget Sound region, the alleged gunman was shot and killed by a Seattle Police Department officer in south Seattle.

From February 3—12, , former LAPD officer Christopher Dorner killed three people including an officer and injured three other officers. On February 12, Dorner engaged in a shootout with police at Big Bear Lake, California , killing one and injuring another.

After killing three civilians and injuring hundreds during the Boston Marathon bombing on April 15, brothers Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev shot and killed a police officer on the campus of MIT.

Later in the night they engaged in a shootout with officers in Watertown, Massachusetts where they injured 16 officers one of them fatally and Tamerlan Tsarnev was killed while Dzhokhar Tsarnev was arrested the next day.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was later convicted for bombing the Marathon, and was sentenced to death. In one of the deadliest gang shootings in United States history, a brawl between rival biker gangs in front of a Twin Peaks restaurant in Waco, Texas escalated into a shootout between rival gangs as well as police.

Nine people were killed and 18 others were injured. After killing nine civilians and injuring nine others at Umpqua Community College near Roseburg, Oregon , shooter Christopher Harper Mercer then immediately engaged in a shootout with responding police officers before killing himself.

Enraged by the shootings of black men Alton Sterling and Philando Castile by police in Louisiana and Minnesota , Micah Xavier Johnson opened fire on Dallas police from an upper floor of a parking garage while the police were overseeing a protest.

The resulting shootout with other present RCMP officers came to an end when Roszko committed suicide after being wounded.

In the ensuing shootout which lasted four hours, rounds were fired and seven gangsters belonging to the D-Company were killed, including Maya Dolas , Dilip Buwa and Anil Pawar.

The conflict ended after police bombed the building in which Bonnot was taking cover. After a shooting rampage which killed up to 13 people including a police officer in the small seaside township of Aramoana, New Zealand, members of the Special Tactics Group STG surrounded the house where shooter David Malcolm Gray was hiding and a gunbattle took place after failed attempts to lure him out.

At the end, Gray ran out of the house, firing his rifle from the hip before being struck and knocked down by gunfire from STG officers.

Gray subsequently died on the journey to hospital. Rodney Ansell was an Australian bushman who served as the inspiration for the "Crocodile" Dundee films.

On 3 August , Ansell ambushed several police officers at a roadblocked intersection and fatally shot one of them.

A gun-battle erupted as more officers arrived on scene, and Ansell was killed in the ensuing gunfight. The day before his attack on police, Ansell had been on a rampage, shooting at houses and wounding several civilians.

Two persons shot dead Ansell and one officer ; several civilians wounded. The shootout had its roots in an intense rivalry that developed after a group of Comancheros broke away and formed the first Bandidos Motorcycle Club chapter in Australia.

Seven people were killed and twenty-eight injured when the two groups clashed at Milperra. The event was a catalyst for significant changes to gun laws in New South Wales.

Milperra, New South Wales Result: On November 26, , 10 members of the Pakastani militant group Lashkar-e-Taiba carried out shooting sprees at several different locations throughout the Indian city of Mumbai.

The terrorists, heavily armed with automatic weapons and explosives, overwhelmed the initial response from lightly armed and minimally trained police and held out for nearly three days, inflicting almost casualties, with deaths including 17 police officers and soldiers.

Mumbai, India Results deaths including 9 of 10 attackers , injuries, 1 terrorist arrested later hanged after being sentenced to death.

Former police officer Rolando Mendoza boarded a bus with Hong Kong tourists taking the occupants hostage.

After freeing 4 children, senior citizens and a disabled woman, the shootout began after the on-board TV broadcast showing the arrest of his younger brother.

Enraged, Mendoza took the tour guide and shot him in the head at the door. The assault killed 8 hostages the youngest being 14 , and wounded 7 hostages, 1 journalist and 1 bystander.

Rizal Park, Manila, Philippines Result: The Kouachis killed two police officers during the Charlie Hebdo shooting on 7 January before fleeing.

Coulibaly shot and killed a policewoman the next day. Finally on 9 January, the Kouachis and Coulibaly held separate sieges which resulted in shootouts with police and all three being killed.

Ile-de-France , France Deaths: On November 9, , Adolf Hitler and at least 2, members of the Nazi Party , which Hitler belonged to, attempted to launch a coup in Munich.

The resulting shootout between Bavarian police and Nazi supporters left twenty people dead and many injured. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

This article is about gun battles. For other uses, see Shootout disambiguation. The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view of the subject.

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Gunfight at the O. Joseph Alexander Mabry, Jr. John Dillinger and Melvin Purvis. Marin County courthouse incident.

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